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Goya blows out the candles on the Prado Museum’s 200th birthday
Goya blows out the candles on the Prado Museum’s 200th birthday Madrid’s famous Prado Museum celebrated its 200th anniversary last week. The Royal Museum of Paintings and Sculptures, as the Prado was first known, opened its doors on November 19, 1819. Two hundred years have passed since then, but at least one thing has not changed: Spanish artist Francisco Goya. Goya, who was born in 1746 and died in 1828, was Spain’s most important contemporary artist back in his day, and arguably still is. There are few issues of current concern, including gender violence, populism, inequality and the hypocrisy of the ruling elite, that were not addressed by the master. This is particularly evident in his drawings, which are the focus of a new exhibition at the Prado entitled “Solo la Voluntad Me Sobra” (or Only My Strength of Will Remains). With 300 drawings on display, it is the biggest collection of his work on paper to date. The aim of the exhibition is to highlight the relevance of his legacy. “I often get asked whether exhibiting contemporary art in these galleries would be appropriate,” says Miguel Falomir, the director of the Prado Museum. “But I believe nothing could be more contemporary than Goya’s work on paper. There is no current artist who has known how to express our nightmares with such precision and depth.” The importance of Goya in the context of the museum, and his relevance to our current era convinced those in charge that the anniversary celebrations – that started in November 2018 with a parade through the museum’s collections – should end with the artist. After all, his 133 paintings, 500 drawings and valuable documents such as his correspondence with his close friend Martín Zapater, have made him one of the main pillars of the museum. But, can Goya still surprise us? According to the exhibition’s curators, Manuela Mena and José Manuel Matilla these little known etchings still have the power to do so. The museum owns the most complete collection of Goya’s drawings in the world, but they cannot be on permanent display due to their conservation requirements. This means they are only shown on special occasions, like for instance the 2015 exhibition of 80 Goya drawings at the Santander Botín Foundation – one of the entities collaborating in the current exhibition. Indeed it was at this exhibition that Matilla had a “revelation.” Conventions dictate that the drawings, because of their small size and the attention they require, should be displayed on a dark background. But Matilla, the head of the Prado’s conservation of drawings and prints, decided to turn that on its head. Those who see the Goya exhibit in the Prado are surprised by the lack of color on the walls. This strategy gives the space the white cube look of a modern art gallery, and means that lightning that is less damaging to the paper can be used. The bold arrangement of the works, designed by Juan Alberto García de Cubas, adds to this modern feel. The etchings are displayed in 23 blocks around two structures in the shape of a cross, which expand the exhibition space. The drawings are well-numbered to allow the visitor to follow the thread chronologically and thematically. Italian Sketchbook Visitors to the exhibition will be able to take a look at Goya’s famous Italian Sketchbook, the first bought by the artist to sketch his ideas on his first stay in Rome, where he would sit by fountains to perfect his sketching technique. Next in the exhibition are Goya’s Pilar Basilica frescoes in Zaragoza, followed by his commercial etchings inspired by Spanish painter Diego Velázquez, letters complete with doodles, more sketchbooks from places such as Sanlúcar de Barrameda, Madrid and Burdeos, lesser-known series such as The Magic Mirror, and the creative seeds of his famous print collections in which his dreams mix with nightmares and criticism with irony, namely Los Caprichos, La Tauramaqui (or Bullfighting), Los Disparates (or The Follies) and Los Desastres de la Guerra (or The Disasters of War). The exhibition ends with work depicting issues that were important to the artist: violence against women, bullfighting, old age, and the manipulation of the masses by the elite. Some of the drawings are mounted on pedestals; in the case of the Sueño de Bruja Principianta (or Dream of a Beginner Witch) (1797), this allows the visitor to get an insight into what was going on in the mind of the artist, who drew on both sides of the page. In a different room, work from one of the three albums that were artificially put together from the sketchbooks by Goya’s son Javier after the artist’s death, have been taken from the album and displayed on the wall. This album was sold in 1866 by Goya’s grandson Mariano to the Trinidad Museum whose collection merged with the Prado’s six years later. The arrival of these works was key for the Prado and its relationship with Goya, whose association with the museum came early on, though it’s impossible to say if it was early enough for him to be present at its inauguration. Curator Manuela Mena likes to think that perhaps Goya left his house for the grand event that day, which she describes as “a very cold day in Madrid,” and then later fell sick with the illness that would take him a month to recover from. Matilla went further: “Perhaps he was annoyed to see himself hanging in the contemporary galleries and not with [Diego] Velázquez.” Six years after the museum opened its doors, Goya wrote from Burdeos to Joaquín María Ferrer, a Spanish politician and book editor who was exiled in Paris. “Thank me for this bad handwriting,” he said. “Because [I have] neither sight, nor pulse, not pen, nor inkwell, I lack everything and only my strength of will remains.” The last phrase was the inspiration for the title of the exhibition. The passion for collecting work by Goya has been a constant throughout the Prado’s 200-year existence. As recently as 2018, it acquired a 1790 letter to Martín Zapater, containing two drawings, which is part of the current exhibition. The exhibition is on display at the Prado Museum until February, 16, 2020.   Source:https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/11/21/inenglish/1574332466_092759.html
Cultural & Creative
Smart Plaza Obolon shopping center is for sale. The most likely buyer is Dragon Capital.
The UDP company Vasily Khmelnitsky and Andrey Ivanov sell the regional Smart Plaza Obolon shopping center, several top managers in the real estate market told at once. Object of 15 000 sq. m. included in the residential complex of the same name, which is located in the Obolon district near the metro station "Minsk". There is already a buyer at the shopping center - IK Dragon Capital, sources from Retailers who are familiar with the deal say. It is noteworthy that UDP last year sold the first object - the Smart Plaza Politech shopping center - immediately after its launch. The investor's plans are to build at least two more shopping centers as part of residential complexes - near metro stations "Goloseevo" and "Arsenal". The three-level shopping center Smart Plaza Obolon is located on street Marshal Timoshenko, 21 next to the shopping center Dream Town (total area - 81,000 square meters). The declared amount of investment in the construction of the facility is $ 14 million. The total area of ​​the Smart Plaza Obolon is 15,000 square meters, and the lease area is 9,000 square meters. "In this facility, more than 60% of tenants are anchor and most of them are restaurants. This concept was chosen not to compete with Dream Town," said Evgenia Loktionova, director of the consulting company UTG (TC broker). According to her, it is expected that after the full launch of the shopping center, the daily flow of visitors will be 20 000-25 000 people. “We choose sites that have natural traffic. This is designed so that neither we nor retailers make additional efforts to attract visitors. District shopping centers will never be able to draw an additional flow of people through advertising,” said the commercial director of A Development (builds several UDP properties) Daria Kukharenko. Negotiations on the sale of the Obolon shopping center UDP have been going on for several months with IC Dragon Capital, a top manager of a real estate development company and a real estate consultant told Retailers. “Negotiations are at an advanced stage - the investor conducts due diligence. The transaction will take place after Smart Plaza Obolon starts working 100%,” said a source familiar with the negotiations. The technical opening of the shopping center took place at the end of January with the opening of the Silpo supermarket, after which other stores gradually began to open. What proportion of the area is now "working" is not entirely clear. At the time of the release of the material, Daria Kukharenko did not respond to the Retailers request sent in a message to Facebook. Also did not respond to the request in UDP and IC Dragon Capital. Update // "We do not comment on rumors. Only completed transactions", - responded in the press service of Dragon Capital. The filling of the Smart Plaza Obolon shopping center will be closely connected with the work of the previous object - the Smart Plaza Polytech shopping center, which was opened a year ago and did not immediately show good results, says Maxim Gavryushin, commercial director of the Budhouse group of companies. Only now this object is beginning to gain momentum. “The location at the Smart Plaza Obolon is good. At this point, there are quite intensive automobile and pedestrian flows, a metro station, and a high building density,” says Maxim Gavryushin. He adds that it will be possible to judge the correctness of the concept after all tenants are opened in the shopping center and the overall picture is visible. “So far, what is already visible now raises some questions, for example, a narrow gallery with a width of less than 6 square meters. There are questions to two-level premises in which, presumably, there will be restaurants,” the expert says. Evgenia Solomatina, head of the commercial real estate department at Cushman & Wakefield in Ukraine, notes that, like in large shopping centers, the first year of work in regional shopping centers is the time when the tenant pool is built in accordance with the target audience, that is, the tenant rotation takes place. “In the regional shopping centers, the concept must be built for the target audience, which is located in the area. After all, those who live nearby will go to this object (no one will specifically go),” adds Solomatina. Note that, according to the real estate market participants, immediately after the opening of the Smart Plaza Polytech shopping center, its owner was Lviv businessman Oleg Balyash. "He owned a land plot under the cinema" Dovzhenko ", where the multifunctional complex is now located. At one time Oleg (Balyash, - Ed.) Contributed a land plot in exchange for a share in the shopping center. When the construction was finished, he bought the rest of the UDP," told Retailers source familiar with the negotiation process. The Polytech Smart Plaza shopping center has a total area of ​​15,000 square meters, opened in early April 2018. It is located near the metro station "KPI" and the campus of the Kiev Polytechnic Institute. UDP plans to build at least two more shopping centers as part of residential complexes - near the Goloseevskaya and Arsenalnaya metro stations. A Development previously stated that they are now focused on the construction of a multifunctional complex near the metro station. "Goloseevskaya", the opening of which is scheduled for the end of 2020. The total area of the WhiteLines shopping center (formerly Goloseevskaya Smart Plaza Goloseevo) will be 31,000 sq.m. When the construction of the IFC at Arsenalnaya will begin is not known.   Source:https://retailers.ua/news/partneryi/8671-tts-smart-plaza-obolon-posle- zaversheniya-stroitelstva-budet-prodan-naibolee-veroyatnyiy-pokupatel---ik-dragon-capital
Cultural & Creative
Bring the joy of design to people and make life better for everyone.
Taiwan Expo 2019 was held in the Philippines on November 8-9 2019. It showcased Taiwan’s best products at SMX Convention Center, Davao. Hosted by the Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Taiwan External Trade Development Council, Taiwan Expo 2019 presented Taiwanese companies in various commercial industries that continue to integrate additional value and innovation into their products. “Taiwan in Design Pavilion” also featured creative products, home decor and accessories from Taiwan Expo 2019. The "Taiwan in Design Pavilion" exhibited the theme of "enjoy design, enjoy life", presenting 50 select pieces of superior design and creativity from 14 Taiwanese manufacturers that received global design awards, among them iF, Red Dot, Taiwan Excellence, GIA, Tokyo Design and more. The work on display also showed that creative design combined the characteristics of traditional culture, science and technology, environmental protection, and more. Some manufacturers such as DR.COLOR LED MEDIA CO. LTD, which presented the new floor clock type with classical spiral design, Mercuries Asia Ltd. which presented the unique Adjustable Electric Wine Aerator Vinaera Pro, TAGather Goods Co. Ltd. which presented the bag with design and function, along with others companies at the "Taiwan at Design Pavilion", demonstrated how Taiwan could transform life inspiration into product value and enhance the beauty elements of life. "Bring the joy of design to people and make life better for everyone", Taiwan's innovative design products are recognized and in demand. The ''Taiwan in Design Pavilion” demonstrated the strength of Taiwan's added-value products in design and inspired interest in business opportunities between the Philippines and Taiwan. “We look forward to developing future economic prospects with the Philippines and to enhancing cultural and economic exchange between the two countries,” said all the exhibitors.
Cultural & Creative
Industry 4.0 vs creative sector: Disruptive or constructive?
The term “4.0” has become widely used in the past few years. From government 4.0 to tourism 4.0, this suffix seems to be something that must be attached to every concept and movement to welcome the era of Industry 4.0. But is it used appropriately, or is it actually keeping Indonesia from benefiting even further from unexplored economic potential? Generally, technology or industry aims to increase productivity and reduce the use of human resources, disrupting previous technology providing business opportunities. Through this process start-ups evolve and create solutions to tackle inefficient business problems. The creative economy is a reaction to the increasing demands for lifestyle and entertainment products. These demands lead to further demand for content, which in their creation and production are deeply related to creative industry. However, traditional creative industry alone is not enough to face the challenge, one also has to understand how the expertise of the business and the business model can be implemented to create a more valuable and creative product. Indonesia's youth gathered at Jakarta's Blok M Square to celebrate Japanese cultural day echinnisai and many even wore traditional Japanese clothing. Japanese cuisine is now also commonplace in the capital, from the very affordable that can be found in roadside stalls to that sold in upmarket shopping malls. Entertainment content originating from Japan, such as Tamagochi, Pokemon, Doraemon and Sailormoon have their own place in the hearts of the Indonesian public. The boost has occurred not only with culture-based products, but other Japanese mass-produced products. According to data from the Association of Indonesian Automotive Industries (Gaikindo), Japanese cars overwhelmingly dominated the car sales market in Indonesia in 2017. The creative economy involves creative processes and creative products that are loaded with cultural values and using them to influence others. The creative economy now involves political and economic values. At this stage, the creative economy focuses on two main things: the creation of soft power, or what is commonly called the power of cultural diplomacy, and the export of creative content or the export of cultural content. In the case of Indonesia's Industry 4.0, the use of start-ups and creative economy terminology are commonly misused interchangeably, whereas the two have very distinct natures in terms of basic concepts, business model and even purpose. Industry 4.0, which is reflected in start-ups, intends to solve a problem by creating the solution. The most common questions that start-ups try to answer are what is a problem that it can solve and what kind of solution can a start-up provide? However, the solution offered usually disrupts an inefficient business process and this changes the way businessmen do their business. Within the creative economy, when an IP creator wants to produce a comic, film, piece of music or game, he or she will not encounter such questions, as the main drive for the industry is not production efficiency but the quality of the content. However, the actual challenge that the creative sector must face is everything related to the balance of trade: how much the creative sector’s exports are worth compared with their imports. In Indonesia, spinning tops are handmade crafts. They are regarded as traditional toys, selling for no more than Rp 20,000 (less than US$1.50). However, by empowering its creative industry, Japan succeeded in creating comics, animation and toys revolving around spinning tops, so much that they are worth a thousand times more than traditional Indonesian tops. In 2013, Pokémon’s IP collected revenue from Japan fashion and merchandise of more than $890 million. This IP alone produced more than US$21 billion, making the IP the highest-grossing media franchise. The creative sector’s role in the national economy is considered highly important, since the economic value chain formed by the industry will disrupt but enhance other sectors of the creative economy. This is the power of the creative economy; every sector is able to support and empower each other. Unfortunately, in Indonesia the ambiguity between Industry 4.0 and the creative economy means the latter is seen and viewed in the same context as Industry 4.0, both by the public and even policymakers. This weakens the creative economy even further and puts it at a disadvantage. Whereas, if we look to other countries as Japan, Korea and China, where they treat their creative sectors with the right understanding and mindset, Indonesia may, too, be able to make the creative economy a featured national program, creating new economic power that can be beneficial for Indonesia.   Source:https://www.thejakartapost.com/life/2019/10/01/industry-4-0-vs-creative-sector-disruptive-or-constructive.html
Cultural & Creative
A researcher highlights the importance of preserving koteka
The Papua Archaeological Center's researcher, Hari Suroto, highlighted the importance of teaching 'koteka' (penis gourd) at schools in the central mountainous region of Papua Province as one of the ways to preserve the cultural heritage of indigenous Papuans. "One way to preserve koteka is teaching it at schools ranging from elementary to middle levels in the central mountainous region of Papua," Suroso said in Jayapura on Sunday. Koteka is made of water pumpkin skin (Lagenaria siceraria). The contents and old pumpkin seeds are removed and the skin is dried. Literally, this word means "clothing" which derived from of the native language of one of the tribes in Paniai. The central mountainous region of Papua covers ten districts namely Jayawijaya, Puncak Jaya, Pegunungan Bintang, Tolikara, Yahukimo, Nduga, Yalimo, Lani Jaya, Mamberamo Tengah, and Puncak. Suroso said, koteka can be included as local content teaching materials at schools in the central mountainous region of Papua. To support this effort, it is necessary to develop a curriculum for the local content of koteka. "By teaching it to the younger generation, it is hoped that this cultural heritage will not disappear because the number of koteka users in Papua is decreasing," he said. Despite the fact that the use of koteka as traditional clothing has diminished, many tribes in the central mountains of Papua still plant water pumpkin as raw materials for making koteka. "This pumpkin is still planted by the tribes of Dani t, Mee, Amungme, Lani, Yali, and Mek," he said. Not all members of young generation in the central mountains of Papua today still use koteka. They do not even know that it is inherited from their ancestors. Suroso said, in the future, it is feared that pumpkin will only be regarded as a vegetable for consumption and medicine for typhoid or a sore throat, while koteka is sold as a souvenir. Concrete steps are needed to preserve koteka by teaching it at schools.   Source:https://en.republika.co.id/berita/pve9az366/a-researcher-highlights-the-importance-of-preserving-koteka

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